Space L Clottey

Early Decision -> if you get in, you go

Early Action? (early application) ->apply early and find out early (if you don’t apply to any reas, you can apply to as many you want at the same time, but no benefit over applying regular. but only because you wanna apply earlier)

uchicago / caltech / mit

(no benefit to applying early)

RESTRICTIVE early action -> apply early and find out early, but you can only apply to one restrictive early action program

can probably ed and rea

strat:

if admitted under ED — are there any EAs i wanna apply to benefit is hear back earlier

— safety’s / matches

only if EAs. then apply

-0 — — — — —

“Oh yes, I’m going to convince myself I’m going to make more money by doing this”

are you just willing to pay for those smart people

Go to places with financial aid.

if you get into MIT, the best

any school that’s really good will pay for you. HYPSMs and Ivy’s, all have generous financial aid

do I wanna make the decision

Build complete college list.

— Start off with entire list of top 100 colleges.

sorted by need blind for international students

with good financial aid

sort by that, and then…

don’t do any more filtering after finding the top 20

— The schools going

Rice will be full fincial aid

Task is:

— — — —

  1. quote that’s like quintesent

“Oh, you don’t know how to sail?”

then second paragraph is more insidious. Either international student. “yeah he’s just the prince of latvia, makes sense” “i get tutoring from blah blah blah”

something that i said sometimes that really surprises other people. Wait a second, you don’t have an endowment named after you.

don’t want it to be too much shitting on other people but a story of how i felt like i didn’t fit in

I didn’t belong. Not only was my skin colour wrong, but so was my wallet.

theirs were solid gold, and there’s where x.

Give an example of one really attrocious thing they said. then a more subtle thing.

I used to be angry / used to think it was really unfair / now i come to recognise everyone is human, and a lot of them act from a place of ignorance. Now have appreciation and respect

“oh you poor poor innocent little trust fund”. shift in opinion. How it makes me better at interacting with people from all walks of life.

all about execution. Toning down on anger, turning up on more woke then they are. eg. used to care a lot about fittign in with their crowd, but fittign in with there’s.

so 3 examples of quotes with small explanationis underneath and then say “i used to think it was really unfair” or something like that

Why this school?

No line of poetry, or code. No artwork or music piece had value because it couldn’t raise your grade.

For five years I was forced into a lane.

My secondary school was torture, one defined by its monofocus on exams, exams and exams. No class was its own thing, no line of poetry, of code, of anything was its own indepedent of how it could raise your grade.

It was so stifling that when the time came to choose our subjects, there was the box between HISTORY or GEOGRAPHY… then the box between SPANISH or FRENCH… and then… everything else. You had only one slot to choose between Computer Science or Art or Media or Music or anything else. With a shudder I chose the thing I liked just barely over everything else, the other possibilities of what I could have studied academically fading into oblivion.

My school’s structure became more and more authoritarian over time, and being squeezed tighter and tighter there was only one way for all the pressure to escape: art. Outside of class, I spent the years coding games and iphone simulators, drawing timetables and animations, writing short stories and novels, making remixes and music. I am a bundle of different interests, one that only got to flourish when the grip on my skull was let go, the demon on my shoulder died, and I finally got the freedom to dream.

This sense of open possibility is excactly what Brown trumpets in its open curriculum. By making every possible class count as credit, it fundemantally validates multifacated people like me for doing the things that they love all at the same time. For six months last year I tried to escape the traditional school system, believing all school’s to be Orwellian nightmare wholes of imprisonment and regulation, and yet researching Brown has shown me it’s the excact type of instituation I would have wanted to escape to.

Next try:

School just didn’t work for me. I hated it. Every second of every day I lived in abject horror that anything I did would lead to the destruction of 4-5 minecraft worlds.

So I took matters into my own hands.

Next try:

For five years, school only represented one thing: comformity. Everywhere I went, everything I did was marked by being told to do it. Attempts at freedom were shut down and attempts at deciding what to study when I wanted to in the ways I saw fit were ignored, ridiculed and shut down.

So all the real learning was at home. School was 8 hours of deadtime, sandwhiched by writing novels, learning shorthand and programming in the morning, and animating, making music and reading in the evenings.

But I couldn’t stand the amount of deadtime. As I got more and more menial homework that didn’t assist my understanding at all and was more just busy work, it sapped more and more time from the interests I loved persuing.

So I quit.

Or I tried. I tried every day for six months. Did you know that if you’re under the age of 16, the only person stopping you in the UK from you dropping out is an email from your guardian, and you don’t even require the official persmission of the school? That was one of the many things I learned as my screen was tiled with windows, desperately trying to figure out through online schools, unschools in the countryside, self employment — desperately trying to figure out if any of the loopholes could work for me.

Through my research I eventually found other people who shared my resentment for school, and together we founded the End School Slavery movement. Through podcasts, videos, tweets and viral blog posts, we tried to make a change to the schooling system. I was also lead on a project on designing a new education system that we would test in India.

Brown supports me in my interests because it is the opposite of what I was trying to destroy: freedom. An open curriculum inherently validates a kaleidescope of interests, and a freedom to persue them at the rate the student determines they need.

— —

Next

(3 quotes)

For five years, school only represented one thing: comformity.

So I quit.

Or I tried. I tried every day for six months. (better fact) That was one of the many things I learned as my screen was tiled with windows, desperately trying to figure out through online schools, unschools in the countryside, self employment — desperately trying to figure out if any of the loopholes could work for me.

Through my research I eventually found other people who shared my resentment for school, and together we founded the End School Slavery movement. Through podcasts, videos, tweets and viral blog posts, we tried to make a change to the schooling system. I was also lead on a project on designing a new education system that we would test in India. (more details on what I did)

Brown supports me in my interests because it is the opposite of what I was trying to destroy: freedom. An open curriculum inherently validates a kaleidescope of interests, and a freedom to persue them at the rate the student determines they need.

— —

For five years, school only represented one thing: conformity.

So I quit.

Or I tried. I tried everyday for six months, to never have to deal with the oppression again. I self-taught web development to be competitive on the market while simultaneously researching every law of education I could, desperately trying to find loopholes that would permit me my freedom.

Through my research I eventually found other people who shared my passion for freedom in learning, and together we founded the End School Slavery movement.

Due to India’s relaxed legislation and our connections there, our first project was to build a new school in India. I was the lead on designing the curriculum, and spent weeks browsing every report on the science of learning I could, trying to figure out what would work to create geniuses that would prove that the standard system of learning was outdated and broken.

But throughout all this I was still stuck in school. I decided to convert what would’ve been a miserable period into as accurate a time capsule of the feeling of being caged as possible through my writing, these time capsules going viral on both Hackernews and Lesswrong.

This success motivated us to create a website with one aim: anyone who entered would be convinced with us that compulsory schooling was terrible by the time we left, and through this we would start a global movement. Between this site and trying to get my mum to let me drop out and learn on my own, I relentlessly studied memetics and pursasion.

Brown supports me in my interests because it is the opposite of what I was trying to destroy: freedom. An open curriculum inherently validates a kaleidescope of interests, and a freedom to persue them at the rate the student determines they need.

And so even when I failed, and I had many months left in school, I decided to use the skills I had to convert what would’ve been a miserable time into as accurate a time capsule of the feeling of being encaged as I could have.

Through podcasts, videos, tweets and viral blog posts, we tried to make a change to the schooling system. I was also lead on a project on designing a new education system that we would test in India. (more details on what I did)

But I was also grimly aware that in freeing myself it would give me far too many degrees of freedom to realease the idea of the billions of students suffering in school from my mind, dying from boredom in their government mandated cages. So I co-founded a movement to destroy all compulsory schooling, replacing them instead with institutions that supported significantly more freedom in learning, such as unschools. We called this movement End School Slavery, creating a twitter account to spread the message of the downsides of schooling, and a website with the intention that anyone who visited it would agree that compulsory schooling had to go by the time they left it.

But I was also grimly aware that in freeing myself I was leaving behind thousands of others who were sufffering just as much as I was, their spirits dying in government mandated cages. So I co-founded a movement to destroy all compulsory schooling, replacing them instead with institutions that supported significantly more freedom in learning, such as unschools. We called this movement End School Slavery, creating a twitter account to spread the message of the downsides of schooling, and a website with the intention that anyone who visited it would agree that compulsory schooling had to go by the time they left it.

Trying to escape compulsory schooling was the hardest thing I’ve ever done. Half a year of nonstop effort, nonstop research. At every turn, every loophole discovered through another dozen hours of research, every shred of hope, there was another obstacle in my way, stopping me from breaking free and spending my days learning and growing the way I wanted to.

It is a grim thought that I am told to think indepndendly by the same insitution that deployed its every recources to keep me where I was.

It is a funny thought that I am told to think independently by the institution, and trying to escape the institution was the most independly I have ever thought.

There is no manual on how to defy every authority in your life, no rulebook on what’s fairgame, no definitions on what consistutes a strike, and excactly how many strikes you have until you’re out. So I actually had to think, and I had to actually try.

And so even when I failed, and I had many months left in school, I decided to use the skills I had to convert what would’ve been a miserable time into as accurate a time capsule of the feeling of being encaged as I could have. I took scraps of paper from my notebooks and began to write articles describing how I felt, one where every force that I had fought against was depicted as a monster which the narrator argued against, as the monster gleefully explained all the forces in the narrator’s way, which was contentious on the group blog “Lesswrong” with over seventy comments. The next was a nonfiction post called “I am Concious and I am Hurting”, honest journal of how I felt, which went viral on news aggregator HackerNews, receiving over two thousand views and over fifty comments. I also appeared on the End School Slavery podcast, explaining my experiences. I also learned web development in order to create a web app that provided an alternate form of learning, a way to self teach from videos using spaced repitition (increview.app).

Combined, I may say that it was worth having to go back to school, for those last months. Creating three artefacts, crystalizing what I felt so clearly are pieces that would be impossible for me to replicate now, the memories being faded with time. And seeing comments of other teenagers who connected with what I had written felt amazing, despite the tragedy.

**

Parts that go out:

Parts that go in:

two initial sentences: why i hated traditional school next paragraph: what i did instead in my own time, i did x/y/z third paragraph: what i decided to do to keep myself doing these things - trying to look for ways out of school. “every single day at home was just me and my laptop taught me ten times as much as a single day at school. So i did everything i could to keep that going” second last: and I knew there were lots of people out me who thougths the same way, ess last: i found my people brown supports me xyz, xyz

What are the most important things that happened with ESS?

19/10/2022

For five years, school only represented one thing: conformity.

So I quit.

Or I tried. I tried everyday for six months, to never have to deal with the oppression again. I self-taught web development to be competitive on the market while simultaneously researching every law of education I could, desperately trying to find loopholes that would permit me my freedom.

But while I searched I was still trapped, forced to deal with deathly boring teaching from a rigid curriclum while I could be learning animation or writing ten times at faster while at home.

Faced with the threat of having an utterly miserable eight months, I decided to convert the dead time into secretly writing blog posts that would be time capsules of my feelings of being caged, “I am concious and I am hurting” going viral on Hackernews.

My writing led me to other people who shared my disaprovement from school, and I realised the importance of freeing everyone. So together we founded the End School Slavery movement.

We tried everything we could to make a dent in the global mandatory prison system — from studying memetics to create a hyper-persuasive website, to sharing our message on twitter and podcasts — we even tried to set up a school in India!

Brown is the antithesis to what I was trying to destroy because it is the excact type of place where a Behaviour Improvement Room would never meet the light of day, where a single box to choose between history and geography, and another to a single subject that you will study for the next three years out of the 12 remaining is something unheard of an foreign, rather than present atn the norm.

An open curriculum inherently validates a kaleidescope of interests, and a freedom to persue them at the rate the student determines they need.

— — —

In Science, we did no experiments.

In Statistics, we collected no data.

In Computer Science, we wrote no code.

In Writing, we followed the structure.

In English, we followed the structure.

— — —

There was no learning

What I learned at school was conformity. But that was no surprise: it’s what they were trying to teach me.

So I quit.

For five years, the dominant lesson I learned at school was conformity. But that was no surprise, it was what they were trying to teach me.

So I quit.

— S —

“3-2-1 Slant”.

30 uniforms obediently dropped their pencils and folded their arms, Sitting straight, Looking at the teacher…

For five years, the dominant lesson I learned at school was conformity.

If it wasn’t on the curriculum, it didn’t exist.

— — — —

Brown’s Open Curriculum allows students to explore broadly while also diving deeply into their academic pursuits. Tell us about any academic interests that excite you, and how you might use the Open Curriculum to pursue them while also embracing topics with which you are unfamiliar. (200-250 words)

“3-2-1. SLANT.”

30 uniforms obediently dropped their pens and folded their arms. Sit straight, Look at the teacher…

For five years, school only represented one thing: conformity.

I wanted to write novels, make music, draw! Not drill the same same questions till my wrists were sore, and dance the same dance for three hours that evening.

So I quit.

Or I tried. If I left I’d need money to sustain myself, so I self-studied web development. Meanwhile I dug as deep as I could into the depths of education law, desperately trying to find loopholes that would give me freedom.

While in jail, I secretly wrote blog posts; time capsules of my feelings of being caged. My post, “I AM CONCIOUS AND I AM HURTING” ended up going viral on Hackernews.

My writing led me to other people who shared my distaste for school, and I realised the importance of freeing everyone. So together we founded the End School Slavery movement.

We tried everything we could to make a dent in the global mandatory prison system. We started a podcast, organised a strike, we even tried to set up an unschool in India!

At Brown, there is no one to tell you to SLANT, and subjects are inherently valuable — not just for the grade you can get for them on a test. X, Y, Z all really assist the culture of creative exploration. An open curriclum simply does just validate a kalidescope of interests, and freedom to persue them without the chain of compulsion around your ankle.

(slavery metaphor? Prison metaphor?)

Nobody is just teaching to the test. Through xyz, Brown forwards a culture of creative exploration bounded only

My writing led me to other people ().

We tried everything we could to make a dent in the global mandatory prison system. We started a podcast, organised a strike, we even tried to set up an unschool in India!

Brown is the antithesis to what I was trying to destroy because it is the excact type of place where a Behaviour Improvement Room would never meet the light of day, where a single box to choose between history and geography, and another to a single subject that you will study for the next three years out of the 12 remaining is something unheard of an foreign, rather than present atn the norm.

An open curriculum inherently validates a kaleidescope of interests, and a freedom to persue them at the rate the student determines they need.