Space L Clottey

Expressing Interest

Zoom call

Virtual Tours

Current Students

Essays

Why this school?

  1. Brown’s Open Curriculum allows students to explore broadly while also diving deeply into their academic pursuits. Tell us about any academic interests that excite you, and how you might use the Open Curriculum to pursue them while also embracing topics with which you are unfamiliar. (200-250 words)

Why this school?

Why me?

Classes:

Appeals to me becasue filmwriting is the crossover of many fields.

Should talk about emailing and getting back the videos.

Something Brown has that the others don’t:

Draft 1

For as long as I’ve known, I have wanted to spend time on multiple projects. When I was a little kid, I would waste hours away crafting made up stories about girls called Lucy and their special stars, and move away shortly after to coding rudimentary iphone simulators on the programming language scratch. To the extent that my mum would have time to teach us piano, I’d go on that, piecing together the classics like Fur Elise and the more complicated. Then returning to my room to put together speeches for the three speachmaking competitions I’d be a part of at any ont time.

In truth, it’s not a terribly difficult idea for me to imagine only doing one thing. It’s not a fear of a drudgery of doing one thing that makes being interdisplicanary so fun, but the tremendous appeal within each individual thing that makes them so beautiful accumulated.

It would be a long, long time before I got bored of programming, and similarly it would be many years before I grew tired of the joy of crafting worlds and characters through writing. But doing them simultaneously combines the deep tremendous joys I get from each of them into one activity.

This is part of what makes the whole study of film such a fascinating one to me. It lives at the crossroads of story, direction and music; the first of which I am okay at, the other two I need a lot more work in. Through in some animation, the likes of which I may learn at “intro to 3D animation” with Professor Meier.

After emailing Professor Meier, it became abundantly clear that this class was to be one that would give me the skills to operate at a crossroad, and it being an open curriculum means that I will be able to delve into each of these directly proportionally to my weaknesses in each of the fields.

And that’s why Brown’s open curriculum suits me. Because I love many differnet things, and I love combining them!

(Make more specific about things I’ve done here that were like this. Also namedrop more)

Draft 3

Okay, go harder on it being about painting the portrait.

It wasn’t the first time I had written something. It wasn’t the first time I had made music. It wasn’t even the first time I had done intense editing and mixing. But it was the first time I had combined all three.

It was the first time I had made a film.

Painting the Portrait, a behind-the-scenes documentary about the creation of the short film The Portrait, took four months and four billion hours to produce at the end of my 12th year of school, and it’s creation process represented everything I adore about my interests: being able to combine them.

I am far from perfect in the fields of crafting stories and pitching narratives, and is something I would very much like to learn in Professor Copjec’s Cinematic Coding and Narrativity, for which the first lesson’s coursework is something I am finding deeply interesting, 50 pages in.

I also operate in extreme gaps in my ability to make music. Though I have mixed, recorded covers for and wrote lyrics to original music, I am yet to devise original instrumentals, and Professor Tan’s Introduction to Popular Music Theory and Songwriting seems positively fascinating as a means to start learning through examples.

And of course, my interest in computer science is not absent, coming in useful through my love of art and animation. Fascinated by the compsci’s department website on what might go on in Professor Meier’s class on 3D animation, I emailed her and found stunning virtula environments hand crafted by students, precisely the skills I would like to generate.

Brown’s open curriculum is ideal for me because it allows me to continue operating at such a glorious place: the crossroads of the things I love. The curriculum being open is something I respect so highly because it allows me to choose which subjects I wish to delve deepest in, filling in my gaps to creating amazing media as quickly as possible.

This is why I would go to brown.

Draft 4

(what’s missing, what’s bad about the above?)

What do I like most from each of them?

At the end of the last academic year, I had been inspired by my filmaking friend, and I took on a project that was unique to all I had undertaken prior. Not because it was the first time I had written something, or edited something…

But because it was the first time I had done them all together.

Now this isn’t to say that any value is detracted from me from delving deep into computer science or writing all on their own: it would a long, long time before I grew bored of understanding more of computer science, and deepeening my knowledge of the subject with classes like Theory of Computation with Prof Stefani are some that I would be most excited to take.

But delving deeper in both the artistic and technical sides of crafting films, taking classes like Intro the 3D Animation and Narrative Coding simultaneously is excactly what will forward my interests, being able to combine them into something like the stunning videos Professor Meier showed me when I emailed her asking for the fruits of her classes over the years.

What makes Brown so irresistably appealing to me is that an open curriculum inherently attracts multifacated people such as myself, which is something current-pupil __ ____ confirmed to me over call. I can’t wait to be around people who validate every part of me, my own skills blossoming as I nurture them in every facet.

Essays

  1. Challenge perspective

Atlas film

  1. brings me joy

Options (increview / painting the portrait / toothbrush dnd)

increview

Todos

Challenging Perspective

  1. Brown’s culture fosters a community in which students challenge the ideas of others and have their ideas challenged in return, promoting a deeper and clearer understanding of the complex issues confronting society. This active engagement in dialogue is as present outside the classroom as it is in academic spaces. Tell us about a time you were challenged by a perspective that differed from your own. How did you respond? (200-250 words)

Planning

Does it fit the main point?

Overcoming a challenge:

Okay let’s go!

Draft 1

Before finding the rationality community, I was pretty normal, as far as convincing people of things went. Though it’s difficult to cast my memory that far back, I imagine I did it as the normal rate. Everything changed in the summer of 2021 when I made friends with people I still love dearly, but people who interestingly had different norms about when to convince people of things or otherwise. In spending a lot of time around these people, I internalised their acts of always correcting people in every minute way I thought they could have been wrong about their affairs.

Which was, of course, grading.

Eventually I too realised what I was doing and how tremeandously annoying it must have been, and immediately recoiled from the practice. A year later, when I started writing a book about quotes, I realised that the villain was that side of me, the side that thought he knew what was best for people and didn’t waste a second making it very clear who he thought was better in the interaction.

It was also probably aided by starting on a full bursary on a school that sincerely housed billionares: being a fish out of water is extremely humbling.

Anyway, during the Atlas Fellowship summer camp, a ten-day summer camp in California teaching high schoolers about the state of the world, I had, a long with the goal of making amazing friends and learning as much as possibe, I had one goal.

I wanted to make a film.

So on day 7, I got to work. I announced the elective and fifteen people flooded to take part in it. Together, we brainstormed the plot and after half an hour — after deciding that Polyamorous-AI-Romeo-And-Julliet was the way to go — we got to work filming.

Filming was excillerating, and the energy was there to begin with, but over time I felt their energy slipping. Of course the other twenty participants and teachers knew that we were making a film and wanted to see it, and I desperately wanted the final piece to exist.

But finally the group energy felll beyond the critical amount, and one of the leaders actors said they didn’t want to film then, that they wanted to film tommorrow.

The schedule for the next day was arguably the most packed day yet, and I knew that if we didn’t film today the film wouldn’t exist.

And I had a choice.

I pushed lightly and nothing had happened. I didn’t even know if it would be possible to convince “Felipe”, but I knew it was my only way to create the film. Pushing up against people was something so long gone, an action now so far away from being natural to me that the idea scared me.

These children were geniuses, and they were older than me, and what was I arguing to take their rest away from? To make a film?

Of course I cared most about the film, that wasn’t a surprise. Once the novelty of the action was gone there was only one person who still desperately wanted it to exist.

And yet the desire to recoil was so tempting. I visualised in my room, I felt viscerally what the null action would be: returning to my room and being sad. And I could, that was the worst part. There was nothing stopping me, no one else who the film was their baby, no one who saw how important it was to me.

But I wanted it to exist.

So I held my breath, and told them. I let it loose on the floor how thoroughly desperately I needed them and that I couldnt do it without them. I layed every shade of honesty of my sincere desperation onto these people I had known for only eight days.

“Okay.”

It WORKED! I ran and got the props needed for the scene, and we shot the remainder as quickly as possible. I then spent all morning editing it, and it premiered the next day. We all gathered, and the main actors were exalteed, everyone laughing throughout its entire runtime. Even the participants who weren’t involved in the film shared it on their twitters and instagrams, and at a current viewcount that is ninetime times my subscriber count, it currently stands as the defacto output of the Atlas Fellowship Group 3 Cohort.

And the boy who wanted to quit? He came up to me, and thanked me for convincing him.

Making misaligned was a challenge. Not just of Felipe challenging me, but of my own standards for when to convince people of things, and when to drop it. For far too long I’ve had the pendulum stuck far too right, and though I’m not at the optimum, I know this process brought me at least slightly closer.

Draft 2

(things to improve: make the alicia thing clearer, probably remove all the raj and floop stuff it’s too complicated).

Need tighter outline, far too many things

  1. Brown’s culture fosters a community in which students challenge the ideas of others and have their ideas challenged in return, promoting a deeper and clearer understanding of the complex issues confronting society. This active engagement in dialogue is as present outside the classroom as it is in academic spaces. Tell us about a time you were challenged by a perspective that differed from your own. How did you respond? (200-250 words)

Outline 2:

When

When the concept of “electives” was first mentioned at the Atlas Fellowship Summer Programme — a ten-day course teaching participants about science, economics and rationality — I instantly thought of film.

I wanted to make a film.

My plan was to announce the elective, and those who also found it as delicously exciting of an idea would come, no coercion necessary.

I was of course incorrect about this.

Making people do things was a dirty, unpleasant thing in my mind. Something born of believing you know better for people than they do themselves. An act of desperation and in limiting people’s freedom.

That was how it started, but it turned out that interest isn’t static. As what started as giddily entertaining filming continued into the night, interested drained — starting as a delightful fun game that I can only assume from the actors perspective as something approaching work.

So they quit.

Not formally at first. They just wanted to push filming to “tommorrow”. But I knew that “tommorrow” when on day eight on a ten day summer camp meant that if we didn’t film now, the film would never exist.

And I had met these people eight days ago. Maybe if it was my brother, or my beloved friends from school the idea of trying to convince them would have felt easier, but the concept of trying to convince them felt to me like being tasked with convincing a dog to cook you breakfast.

And I played with the idea, in my mind. Of going to my room and doing what I normally would have done, which is doing my best to respect people when they explicitly tell me their preferences and just say goodbye to the film.

But I wanted the film to existed. We wanted the film to exist. And just eight hours earlier they wanted it to exist as much as I did. I was being faced with the decision to potentially prioritise what I wanted over what they were saying they wanted, but in truth it was a decision of honesty.

Was I going to be honest with them about how badly I wanted and needed them?

And I decided the answer was yes.

I released my normal constraints imported for normal societal function and told them in as strong, openly emotional terms I could how badly I needed them and how badly I wanted Misaligned to exist.

And somewhere along the line, something I said must have worked.

Almost reluctantly, all the actors needed for the final scene agreed to finish, and we filmed the final scene where the AI is killed, the boys kill themselves in heartbreak, and the AI destroys the world in heartbreak.

The next day we all stood scattered amongst the other Atlas Fellows, participants and instructors sitting down to enjoy the finished product alltogether. And everyone really did enjoy it! There were laughs the entire way through.

If how far you should be willing to go to convince people of things in a pendulum, I realised that day that I was too far on the side of permitance, known now to be my other names of fear and safety.

The persuit to make a film led me into danger. But I wasn’t sure until Philip came up to me and thanked me for convincing him.

Then I knew it was worth it.

(“of course, I wasn’t just writing about something I believe. The thing that challenged this belief was none other than “film”!)

Draft 3

Outline 3:

— When the concept of “electives” was first mentioned at the Atlas summer camp, I knew I wanted to make a film. My plan was to announce the elective, and those who found the idea of making something as delicously exciting as I did would show up, no coercion necessary.

I soon learned I was incorrect about this.

It started off with the actors being as interested in everything as I was! But interested wained as we continued into the night, what had been giddy roleplay transforming into what must have felt like work.

So they quit.

But what could I do? Outside of the idea of trying to coerce them feeling unethical and dirty… it was scary. I had met these people eight days ago, and I wanted to be nice and friendly and for them to like me!

But I also wanted the film to exist. Everyone did! I knew that it was possible for people to be wrong about their preferences — I was all the time. But would I dare place my needs over theirs?

No, that wasn’t the question. The question was whether I was going to be honest with them about how badly I needed them for us to create something together.

And I decided the answer was yes.

I let go of my normal constraints and laid apon them a heartfelt, desperately honest plea for their help and cooperation… and they accepted! What had felt like an iron clad refusion concluded in every actor, participant and insructor sitting together on the final night of camp, laughing at the story we had crafted out of nothingness — something that everyone gets to take and say they were a part of.

But I still wasn’t sure I had made the right decision until after the screening, when the lead actor came up to me, and thanked me for convincing him.

Then I knew it had been worth it.

DAMMIT.

I need to get rid of an entire plot point.

  1. Brown’s culture fosters a community in which students challenge the ideas of others and have their ideas challenged in return, promoting a deeper and clearer understanding of the complex issues confronting society. This active engagement in dialogue is as present outside the classroom as it is in academic spaces. Tell us about a time you were challenged by a perspective that differed from your own. How did you respond? (200-250 words)

Draft 4

When the concept of “electives” was first mentioned at the Atlas summer camp, I knew I wanted to make a film. I’d announce it, and those who found the idea of making something as delicously exciting as I did would show up, no coercion necessary. Right?

It started off with the actors being as interested in everything as I was! But interested wained as we continued into the night, what had been giddy roleplay transforming into what must have felt like work.

So they quit.

But what could I do? Outside of the idea of trying to coerce them feeling unethical and dirty… it was scary. I had met these people eight days ago, and I wanted to be nice and friendly and for them to like me!

But I also wanted the film to exist. Everyone did. And I knew the question wasn’t anything but whether I was going to be honest with them about how badly I needed them for us to create something together.

And I decided the answer was yes.

I let go of my normal constraints and laid apon them a heartfelt, desperately honest plea for their help and cooperation… and they accepted! What had felt like an iron clad refusion concluded in every actor, participant and insructor sitting together on the final night of camp, laughing at the story we had crafted out of nothingness — something that everyone gets to take and say they were a part of.

But I still wasn’t sure I had made the right decision until after the screening, when the lead actor came up to me, and thanked me for convincing him.

Then I knew it had been worth it.

Challenging Perspective Wellington Version

  1. One of the quotes can be “as if anyone would ever bunk the train”
  2. The top one? the worst one?
  3. people touching my hair
  4. mathea like excluding me and not looking at me and constantly talking about people and events that I don’t know about
    1. eventually developing huge “fuck you” energy about people talking about things I don’t know about in front of me
  5. when dhruv and anya were just speaking mandarin
  6. probably shit about people konwing people who work at mcdonald’s
  7. me explaining to alex about how you have to give people context so they’re happy about your accomplishments, and giving the example of explaining the SAT to my mum

My humor and exisitng things I know about are also just insanely different than everyones.

Okay:

  1. Mallinson library
  2. “as if anyone would ever bunk the train”

did I ever say anything? “I used to do those surveys they paid you 10p to do” “My mum won’t drive me to and from school / my mum doesn’t drive”. “my mum’s a bartender”. I don’t say these things cos I don’t want to make people sad. But I probably have. ohh, people being racist. In the bathroom. yes that’s very very annoying. or saying the n-word or playing it in music or expecting me to punish people for almost saying the n word and me saying “i hate this game, stop” and them basically ignoring me.

I was like “if I got A* I would’ve been on quadroople A*” and she was like “oh shut up”.

Or me realising that there are people who do all a levels? or me not getting very good gcses? or

“…and then the bobby came up to me and was like ‘can I see your ticket?’ Oh yeah, as if paying £2.50 for a ticket is so unimaginable.”

I squirmed in my seat. “Sorry, Mr Smith.” I thought silently to myself. “It’s just I wanted to see my friend ever again when he moved up north, and my mum wasn’t going to pay for it”.

“Oh yeah, my uncle was x Mallinson,” said my friend Celeste. She was in the year above me, and was incredibly sweet. “Oh yeah?” I replied.

“Yeah. Like the library.”

It took me a second, as I tried to connect the dots. “What’s the mallinson library?”

“Like the school library. It says it on the front. Mallinson Library. My uncle paid for it.”

Ah, of course.

“Come on! Tell him off, Space!”

I stopped brushing my teeth and looked at the boy they had been holding. I generally enjoyed their games and smiled as I found out what was going on.

The smile quickly clenching in anxiety as I realised what they were trying to get me to do.

“He said it! He said it!” They chanted.

“I said liquor,” said the boy they were holding, and I frowned.

Everyone else being rich was the entire premise of getting a scholarship to Wellington College, but I didn’t realise until after I got here just how many implications that had. Many problems of my youth were simply unimaginable to them — the struggle of having to explain to your mum what the SAT was a completely unfathomable task to them.

But as I slowly became friends with more and more people who had been born in surreally different environments than me, I realised that the parts of our histories we had shared became all the more incredible, that our struggles could be replicated with such a large gap in time, space, and money.

I realised I could love people anywhere I was.

— — — —

“Who does he think I am?

“…and then the bobby came up to me and was like ‘can I see your ticket?’ Oh yeah, as if paying £2.50 for a ticket is so unimaginable.”

I squirmed in my seat. “Sorry, Mr Smith.” I thought silently to myself. “It’s just I wanted to see my friend ever again when he moved up north, and my mum wasn’t going to pay for it”.

“Yeah, my uncle was Mallinson,” said my friend Celeste. She was in the year above me, and was incredibly sweet.

“Oh yeah?” I replied.

“Yeah. Like the library.”

It took me a second. “What library?”

“Like the school library. It says it on the front. Mallinson Library. My uncle paid for it.”

Ah, of course.

“Come on! Tell him off, Space!”

“I didn’t say it!” said the boy they were holding.

“I definately heard it,” said David, the boy holding his right arm.

“I swear! I said liquor! I didn’t say the n-word!”

Ah, of course.

I had trouble fitting in at Wellington. I was one of x kids. Everyone around me was paying more for class than my mum was __. I had trouble connecting. I didn’t know how to ski or sail, they wanted to feel how sharp my hair was

(i was angry, not willfully malicious, ignorant). But eventually we found common ground. (some examples)

Everyone else being rich was the entire premise of getting a scholarship to Wellington College, but I didn’t realise until after I got here just how many implications that had. Many problems of my youth were simply unimaginable to them — the struggle of having to explain to your mum what the SAT was a completely unfathomable task to them.

But as I slowly became friends with more and more people who had been born in surreally different environments than me, I realised that the parts of our histories we had shared became all the more incredible, that our struggles could be replicated with such a large gap in time, space, and money.

I realised I could love people anywhere I was.

“and we all had so much to learn from eachother” and then remaining words, brown x community

“Who did he think I was?” my teacher asked to the class. “Coming up and checking if I’d paid for my ticket, like £2.50 for a train is so unimagineable.”

I squirmed in my seat. “Sorry, Mr Smith,” I thought silently to myself. “It’s just my mum was struggling to afford rent, let alone trains, and I still had to get to school.”

“Yeah, my uncle was Jeremy Mallinson,” said my friend Celeste. She was in the year above me, and was incredibly sweet.

“Oh yeah?” I replied.

“Yeah. Like the library.”

It took me a second. “What library?”

“Like the school library. It says it on the front. Mallinson Library. My uncle paid for it.”

Ah, of course.

“Come on! Tell him off, Space!”

“I didn’t say it!” said the boy they were holding.

“I definately heard it,” said David, the boy holding his right arm.

“I swear! I said liquor! I didn’t say the n-word!”

Ah, of course.

It wasn’t very unexpected that I’d have trouble fitting in at Wellington, but it still stung. I was one of 12 Prince Albert Scholars and 6 black people in the entire school, and everyone around me was paying more for pizza each term than I’d spent my entire life.

I wanted to know how to ski, swim and sail, and they wanted to know how my curly hair felt.

Many problems of my youth were simply unimaginable to them — the struggle of having to explain to your mum what the SAT was a completely unfathomable task to them.

But as I slowly became friends with more and more people who had been born in surreally different environments than me, I realised that the parts of our histories we had shared became all the more incredible, that our struggles could be replicated with such a large gap in time, space, and money.

We found common ground — like how me and the billionare girl both mercilessly quoted movies, how me and the malaysian prince both found the same things hillarious, how me and the oxford-raised private school boy both freaked out about VR and AI.

It still stuns me to realise, but I am proud of getting to say I am so many people’s first black friend.

that we had unknowingly shared past struggles through time, space and large discrepencies in money.

——

  1. Brown’s culture fosters a community in which students challenge the ideas of others and have their ideas challenged in return, promoting a deeper and clearer understanding of the complex issues confronting society. This active engagement in dialogue is as present outside the classroom as it is in academic spaces. Tell us about a time you were challenged by a perspective that differed from your own. How did you respond? (200-250 words)

“Yeah, my uncle was Jeremy Mallinson,” said my friend Celeste. She was in the year above me, and was incredibly sweet.

“Oh yeah?” I replied.

“Yeah. Like the library.”

It took me a second. “What library?”

“Like the school library. It says it on the front. Mallinson Library. My uncle paid for it.”

Ah, of course.

“Come on! Tell him off, Space!”

“I didn’t say it!” said the boy they were holding.

“I definately heard it,” said David, who was holding the boy’s right arm.

“I swear! I said liquor! I didn’t say the n-word!”

Ah, of course.

I didn’t expect to fit in at Wellington, but it still stung. I was one of 12 full-scholarship students in the entire school, and everyone around me was paying more for pizza each term than I’d spent my entire life.

I wanted to know how to ski, swim and sail, and they wanted to know how my curly hair felt.

But as I came to make more friends, I realised that the parts of our histories we’d shared became all the more incredible; that our struggles bridged such large gaps in time, space and money.

The billionare girl and I both mercilessly quoted movies. The Malaysian scion and I both found __ funny.

And through each new perspective, I became more and more of a student.

It still stuns me to realise, but I am proud of getting to say I am so many people’s first black friend.

  1. either directly ansewrs
  2. reemphises effort /amount of work to understand other people
  3. or emphasises the approach i took - eg. buliding empathy through late night conversations

i let myself learn go into the interactions as a student - of what’s possible let my persepctive be widened

Activity I enjoy essay

  1. Brown students care deeply about their work and the world around them. Students find contentment, satisfaction, and meaning in daily interactions and major discoveries. Whether big or small, mundane or spectacular, tell us about something that brings you joy. (200-250 words)

Outline:

Why do I do the programming?

What skills does it require?

Have I achieved something I’m proud of?

How has it impacted my personality?

Impacted personality?

Affected future goals

You can only have one point.

Deserving to get things wrong is an interesting one, but it doesn’t relate to extreme challenges. Also, I’m not that rigorous anyway, but I don’t really get indignant at reality.

Point:

does it fit the prompt? yeah, and I kinda get to talk about challenges

true? yeah Send a message about me?

Outline:

Okay, get it more consice. should i flex about the $10k in this?

Outline 2:

For whatever reason, the art of coding clicked with how my brain worked as a child in a very natural way. I got how the computer did excactly what you told it to in excactly the way that you said, and so I spent my childhood creating more and more elaborate games on the babified Scratch programming language, experimenting with just how elaborate I could go.

But it still wasn’t enough, becuase they weren’t quite useful. So one day, after dabbling with real code a fair bit, my friend Raj and I set ourselves the challenge of designing and programming one new web app for every week in the summer.

And it was excillerating. SleepTap was the first site we made, one born of a dissatisfaction with current ways of trakcing one’s sleep. It used every skill of elementary HTML I knew and then some, forcing me to learn how to store data in the browser and retrieve it for later.

And the trend continued. Each project we took on would feel impossible from the onset, such that I truly didn’t know whether I’d be able to do it. But making something functional was the goal, so each week I was forced to pick apart some voodoo I would never understand prior.

And it was cool! But it was terrible. It caused me to want to kill myself and become a mascot for cocopops, but I decided against it. I knew better than that.

Walter’s smart. Why is he a high school teacher? Where did he go wrong in life?

This is a shitty essay. There’s no way to make it good.

I need to make it more linear. force it so that theres only enoguh time to write everything excactly once.

In the summer of 2021, my friend Raj and I wanted to learn web design and programming, respectively. So we set the challenge to feature plan, design, and program a minimal viable product of a new site each week.

And the trend continued. Each project we took on would feel impossible from the onset, such that I truly didn’t know whether I’d be able to do it. But making something functional was the goal, so each week I was forced to pick apart some voodoo I would never understand prior.

And it was cool! But it was terrible. It caused me to want to kill myself and become a mascot for cocopops, but I decided against it. I knew better than that.

  1. Brown students care deeply about their work and the world around them. Students find contentment, satisfaction, and meaning in daily interactions and major discoveries. Whether big or small, mundane or spectacular, tell us about something that brings you joy. (200-250 words)

Okay, his idea for the programming one was:

what ads do I wanna do?

Tired of being tired? Want to get your sleep in order?

Well be frustrated no more! Say hello to Sleep Tap, the only app that lets you track your sleep with just a single tap. Say goodbye to fiddling through menus when you’re on your final stretch of brainpower, and say hello to good sleep.


Keeping a calendar helps you not get too busy. But what if you’re too busy for even a calendar? With Odyssey, you can plan your day on the go.

Imagine a schedule that changes as the day goes on, one that automatically squashes and stretches the time for activities depending on how much time you have left in the day.

Break out of contraints and say hi to freedom with Odyssey.


Love watching educational youtube videos but can never remember what you’ve learned? Forget about forgetting with Increview. Make notes as you learn and learn while you watch with Increview, available today at Increview.app.


Once apon a time, in the summer of 2021, a version of myself who didn’t know programming challenged myself to create one website a week. My first project looked closest to a Craigslists knockoff. But after weeks of reading documentation, poking around terminals and ______ we were finally getting somehwere. It felt amazing watching the characters I typed transform into images and menus and buttons and websites. Creating something with my own two hands brings me joy.

— Once upon a time, in the summer of 2021, a version of myself who didn’t know programming challenged myself to create one website each week. Through it, I experienced the elation of crafting websites through my own hands, chanelling the architecture I had seen all over the internet through myself and rederiving it, combing bricks of what I had seen before to create something completely new.

— databse

more imagery, more emotion. more cheesy