Space L Clottey

Brown’s Open Curriculum allows students to explore broadly while also diving deeply into their academic pursuits. Tell us about any academic interests that excite you, and how you might use the Open Curriculum to pursue them while also embracing topics with which you are unfamiliar. (200-250 words)

“3-2-1. SLANT.”

30 uniforms obediently dropped their pens and folded their arms. Sit straight, Look at the teacher…

For five years, school only represented one thing: conformity.

I wanted to write novels, animate, make music! Not drill the same same inane questions till my wrists were sore, and redo it all that evening.

So I quit.

Or I tried. If I left I’d need money to sustain myself, so I self-studied web development.

By night, I dug as deep as I could into the depths of education law, desperately trying to find loopholes that would give me freedom.

By day, during class, I secretly wrote blog posts; time capsules of what I felt being caged. My post, “I AM CONCIOUS AND I AM HURTING” ended up going viral on Hackernews.

My writing led me to other people who shared my distaste for school, and I realised the importance of freeing everyone. So we founded the End School Slavery movement.

We tried everything we could to make a dent in the global mandatory prison system. We started a podcast, organised a strike, we even tried to set up an unschool in India!

At Brown, there is no one to tell you to SLANT, and subjects are inherently valuable — not just for the grade you can get for them on a test.

X, Y, Z all really assist the culture of creative exploration.

An open curriculum simply does just validate a kaleidoscope of interests, and freedom to pursue them without the chain of compulsion around your ankle.

Rip, not getting to talk to him

Oka

Chatting with Professor Meier and seeing the art that was pumped out of her intro to 3D animation class, proved that it’s not done for the sake of something else.

Chatting with Professor Meier and seeing the art that came out of her Intro to 3D animation class proved that making something beutifully and technically sound wasn’t just a faraway product, but central to the goal of her class. And as someone who has spent many lifetimes drawing away at individual frames of animation, I knew the amount of work that would have had to go into it. I adore the idea of being in her class and learning to explore the technical depths, and mimick the creation of intricate virtual worlds that I’ve been admiring my heroes at Pixar accomplish since I was born.

But evolving from 2D to 3D animation is not the only area I want to explore while at Brown. I have adored piecing together pieces of music by the millisecond, spending days coming up with lyrics and weeks recording and syncing the vocals to the background tracks. But never before have I invented my own melody, and Professor Welch’s intro to Music Theory is a class that I am super excited to take. Combined with Introduction to Popular Music theory and Songwriting, I am excited to figure out how those who do it professionally do what takes me days so much faster than me. And to again go deeper into a subject I am only surface level familiar with at the moment.

I love Disney (being a near-perfect crossroad of animation, music and incredible storytelling) and I love accapella, but have never done them together, making the Disney Accapella group such a delightfully fascinating club I would love to join. And so much of the westeren animation I adore and take inspiration from in my own wriitng is itself inspired heavily by anime, I have never delved deeper into its world beyond its truly iconic standouts. Delving deeper into this world makes Anime Club an incredibly appealing option.

This is NOT 250 words.

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Second version:

“3-2-1. SLANT.”

30 uniforms obediently dropped their pens and folded their arms. Sit straight, Look at the teacher…

For five years, school only represented one thing: conformity.

I wanted to write novels, animate, make music! Not drill the same same inane questions till my wrists were sore, and redo it all that evening.

So I quit.

Or I tried. If I left I’d need money to sustain myself, so I self-studied web development.

By night, I dug as deep as I could into the depths of education law, desperately trying to find loopholes that would give me freedom.

By day, during class, I secretly wrote blog posts; time capsules of what I felt being caged. My post, “I AM CONCIOUS AND I AM HURTING” ended up going viral on Hackernews.

My writing led me to other people who shared my distaste for school, and I realised the importance of freeing everyone. So we founded the End School Slavery movement.

We tried everything we could to make a dent in the global mandatory prison system. We started a podcast, organised a strike, we even tried to set up an unschool in India!

At Brown, there is no one to tell you to SLANT, and subjects are inherently valuable — not just for the grade you can get for them on a test.

X, Y, Z all really assist the culture of creative exploration.

An open curriculum simply does just validate a kaleidoscope of interests, and freedom to pursue them without the chain of compulsion around your ankle.

— — —

Less about complaining about conformity and more about how I’d thrive in the absence of it?

“3-2-1. SLANT.”

30 uniforms obediently dropped their pens and folded their arms. Sit straight, Look at the teacher…

For most of my life, school hasn’t really a place for well, learning.

So I quit.

Or I tried. By night, I would self-teach web development so that I’d have a living after I quit. By day, I secretly wrote blog posts that were to permanently capture my feelings of being caged. One post “I AM CONCIOUS AND I AM HURTING” went viral on HackerNews.

My writing found others, which led me to found the End School Slavery movement, where we started a podcast, organised a strike, and even tried to set up an unschool in India!

This is what I would have wanted my unschool to become. But at Brown, there’s no one to tell you to SLANT. I’ve got a kaleidoscope of interests; I’ve always been fascinated by the works of Pixar, creating many 2D animations myself. Brown’s open curriculum would enable me, while planning to major in computer science, also to take classes like Intro to 3D Animation with Professor Meier.

After I emailed her, she showed me the incredible art that came out of that class, and those 3D worlds are ones that I would be delightfully proud to make myself.

By sincerely validating going beyond a rote curriculum, an open curriculum pushes me to delve deeper into the topics I’ve just dipped a toe into.

brown - as long as you take the cources that get you a concentration, you can take whatever you want out of that

two writing courses

in waniel’s

cannonical legendary brown professors

other schools - you have to take major for courses, you have to take core rocciculum

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Make it more about being able to do anything, not just specific classes.

Outline

vivo.brown.edu

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Open curriculum version (2022-10-31)

Okay, overall point: I’m a person who has thought a lot about learning how to learn Has thought passionately about it myself to either try to drop out or change it for everyone, and probably just say change it for everyone brown open curriculum is that, and be very specific about brown

Learning how to learn has been an interest of mine for a very long time.

As a pre-teen I would watch videos about the Feynam method of notetaking, and replicate it, unfortunately finding that it did not work for me.

Slightly older, I would read book apon book, learning how to speed read as fast as possible, and for a period getting through one book every two days. It was hell, but it was worth it, and is arguably my period of greatest growth.

As an actual teen, I began to reach out into more expressive tools, like SuperMemo. SuperMemo was the first tool that allowed me to learn from so many topics at once, and the rate at which I imported materials grew exponentially. I went from reading just self help to psychology and philosophy and business and economics all simultaneously, never knowing what would come up whenever I told the program to give me the next thing to read.

But it was stiill suboptimal.

So I created my own.

In the goal of using the most optimum way to learn, I created my own Incremental Video software, a tool that would allow me to learn from videos over time. Eventually, as my web development progressed, I worked on a tool to learn from all texts over time, called ReadAgain, winning $10k at a pitch competition for my team to complete further work on the project.

I cared about finding the true way of learning well, and was really disatisfied with school too. So I started a movement called End School Slavery that would fix schools all over. I was even head of design on a curriclulum where we were going to try to fix schools in India.

I want to go to Brown because the open curriculum is the ideal of learning that I’ve been trying to forge myself for the past four years. An open curriculum inherently validates having a wide array of interests, inherently allows one to change what is their biggest focus many times over the course of their university experience, all while being the excact opposite of any uni here at home in the UK.

— — —

I want to go to Brown because the open curriculum is the ideal of learning that I’ve been trying to forge myself for the past four years. A concentration is no use if it inherently limits you from branching out into other things at a remotely equivalent depth. I don’t just want to become an aswesome over-powered compsci nerd who can bend the powers of computers to my every will and whim, and be barely passable at making music or film. I want to be good at everything.

Getting to control things, being able to bend mediums to squeeze goodness out of them using my own hands is what I want. I want to be able to touch any medium, be it code or animation or text or song, and have quality and utility and emotion come out of it.

This is my goal, and this is what makes an open curriculum so useful. By truly allowing me to care about multiple things at once, and to craft a concentration that proves it cares about multiple things as much by giving them each the time they deserve, not squashing them into the free time in the gaps between a million classes that I’m required to take but that will not forward my goals of great competence everywhere.

Also, the pass fail allows me to care about each class while truly caring about my overarching goal, not getting sucked into purely academic goals.

I want a concentration of competence in every medium.


I know what you might be thinking, Brown Admissions person.

“By heavens! Good golly! Doesn’t this cheeky UK bugger know about the Modern Culture and Media course? Particularly the practice track, that would allow him to explore all of these interests and become competent in all of these? I’m gobsmacked.”

But being able to be so interdisciplinary is only part of what makes Brown so fun. It’s also the freedom to evolve. I wasn’t always interested in animation, it was only 4 years ago that my drawings started to move. I never took seriously the notion of creating music since about 3 years ago.

My history has been punctuated by change and evolution, going deeper into interests I only ever touched. Being able to switch so effortlessly and take something new as seriously, something I can’t even predict that I could fall in love with now. And being able to take such an action with minimal stakes.

This also is what makes Brown so appealing. Permitting change and growth and evolution in my interests.

I can control the weather.

what do I want to do??? what major do I want to create?

want to take all of these. I know it.

Why do I want to take all of them?


compsci / film / writing / music

seems kinda like it’s just “make your own 3D animated films…”

how much code is in 3D films? Compsci is maybe the only non media-y

Medium competence? Are there other mediums that aren’t representenced here?

Being able to direct music/real actors.

Modern Culture and Media (MCM) is an interdisciplinary concentration that explores the ties between media and broader cultural and social formations. critical study and production of a certain type or combination of media (print, photography, sound recording, cinema, video, television, and digital media

Can’t tell if you’re making your own films here

Okay it looks like basically normal studying and understanding of film/tv

add practice courses.

Okay, wha’ts missing? compsci

why i love this concentration why can’t have at other school becuase no practice courses

• How do you plan on studying this? What fields are you intending to integrate? How are you in-tending to integrate them? Think about bridge courses.

• Who are you able to study with here? What is a focus area, or topic you want to explore more deeply via advanced coursework and your capstone/thesis? What methods course will prepare you for this self-directed project?

Interdisciplinary arts

interests always evolving

Even though this interdisciplinary arts thing seems really really nice, I could still want to do anything

Outline: